3 Communication Steps to Get Great Results from Temporary Professionals

Professional communicators know that taking the time to train new staff yields the greatest results for the least amount of effort.  That’s true working with temporary professional staff and freelancers, too.

PRofessional Solutions, LLC provides experienced public relations temps to clients who want professionals who can “hit the ground running”.  Over the years we’ve seen that the moComment_Boxst productive relationships are the ones where clients invest time in three key communications steps.

Step 1:  Define your expectations for the assignment.  Tell the temporary professional what you need, what objectives you need to accomplish and what success will look like.  A pro will be flexible about working with different clients and adapting to their styles and requirements once they understand what they are.

Step 2:  Outline timelines and organizational requirements.   At the beginning of the assignment share the important events and key dates that relate to the assignment in regards to work production, inter-office collaborations and outcome measurements.  Do you need a document draft by a certain time?  Does another office need to receive the draft schedule for an upcoming press event in order to provide support?

Step 3:   Provide feedback early.  I’m amazed when someone reports that the selected PR temp isn’t working out only to find that nothing has been said to the person about what needs to be changed.  A professional wants to provide positive results for his or her client, and so appreciates feedback and constructive criticism.  It’s a more efficient use of your time to speak up early about what you want changed than to start over with someone new.

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About Kate Perrin

Kate Perrin is CEO of PRofessional Solutions, LLC, the Washington, DC area's only public relations temporary staffing firm. PRofessional Solutions, founded in 1994, was named one of the 25 largest staffing agencies in the metropolitan area in 2015 by the Washington Business Journal. It's also proud sponsor of Washington Women in Public Relations and the Public Relations Society of America's National Capital Chapter.
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